Printed at: 08:39:41 / 17-02-2019

Helipad Appeal

Helipad Appeal logoBecause of you… We can save more lives

#Preparing to Land
Did you know we are in the final stages of fundraising for a new helipad within the hospital complex? We need to raise a final £1.5m (the equivalent of just £16 for every person treated in our Emergency Department alone last year) to stay on track to be operational by the summer of 2020.

We want to improve accessibility to our emergency medicine facilities for our local community to ensure everyone has access to our care when they really need it. We are so excited to be planning this life saving facility for our local community and would welcome your support in helping us to make it happen.

Raising funds for a helipad within the hospital complex:
When someone suffers a major trauma the quicker they receive specialist emergency care, the more likely it is that the treatment will prevent death or serious disability. This is often referred to as the ‘Golden Hour’ and emergency services strive to get patients to the most appropriate place for lifesaving care within an hour of sustaining their injury. Helicopters offer a much more reliable way of transporting critically ill patients as they significantly reduce travel time compared to a land ambulance.

The Emergency Department at the L&D is renowned as one of the best in the country and treats over 90,000 people each year. Approximately 25% of these have life threatening injuries and require immediate and specialist medical care.

There is currently no helipad providing direct access to the hospital and no 24/7 helipads specifically for Herts, Beds and Bucks. At present, while it is possible to airlift patients to the hospital, the helicopters must land in a local playing field and the patient is then transferred over the final distance by road. Air Ambulances have to travel from as far away as Northampton and Cambridgeshire to get to patients, and if the road journey from the current landing location to the hospital is deemed too risky these patients can be taken to the nearest emergency helipad – 25 miles away – rather than being brought to the L&D.