Share this page:
Infection Control at L&D

Infection Control at the L&D


We’re fighting hospital infections and in April 2009 we introduced a policy of MRSA Screening for every in-patient undergoing either elective or emergency surgery or treatment.

We are attacking the causes and incidence of infection in our hospital to achieve ‘no avoidable infection’ status. This means that we aim to make sure that no patients acquire new hospital infections while in our care.

MRSA

2017-2018

April 2017 - number of new cases = 0

(NB: Figures for MRSA bacteraemia include both inpatient and GP specimens)


MRSA

2016-2017

March 2017 - number of new cases = 1
February 2017 - number of new cases = 1
January 2017 - number of new cases = 0
December 2016 - number of new cases = 1
November 2016 - number of new cases = 2
October 2016 - number of new cases = 0
September 2016 - number of new cases = 0
August 2016 - number of new cases = 0
July 2016 - number of new cases = 0
June 2016 - number of new cases = 0
May 2016 - number of new cases = 0
April 2016 - number of new cases = 0

(NB: Figures for MRSA bacteraemia include both inpatient and GP specimens)

 

2015-2016

April 2015 - March 2016 Total number of new cases = 3 
 

2014-2015

April 2014 - March 2015 Total number of new cases = 7

(NB: Figures for MRSA bacteraemia include both inpatient and GP specimens)

  • MRSA are bacteria that are not affected by some common antibiotics. They can be present in the nose or skin of healthy people without causing a problem.

  • MRSA can cause serious infection in sick patients in hospital if they get into the body through a cut and into the blood stream.

  • It is spread by direct contact with an affected patient or by indirect contact with the bacteria in the environment.

  • Spread can be prevented by everyone washing his or her hands properly, or hand cleaning with alcoholic gel and by keeping the hospital clean. Some patients affected by MRSA may also need to be kept apart from other patients to prevent it spreading further.

  • MRSA infections can be treated with special antibiotics.


C-difficile 

2017-2018

Our trajectory target for 2017-2018 is 6.

April 2017 - number of new cases = 1

 (NB: The figures for C.diff include only hospital-acquired cases) 


C-difficile 

2016-2017

Our trajectory target for 2016-2017 was 6.

March 2017 
 - number of new cases = 1    
February 2017 - number of new cases = 0    
January 2017 
- number of new cases = 0
December 2016 - number of new cases = 2 
November 2016 - number of new cases = 0 
October 2016 - number of new cases = 0 
September 2016 - number of new cases = 1 
August 2016 - number of new cases = 0 
July 2016 - number of new cases = 2 
June 2016 - number of new cases = 2
May 2016 - number of new cases = 0
April 2016 - number of new cases = 1

 (NB: The figures for C.diff include only hospital-acquired cases) 


2015-2016

April 2015 - March 2016 number of new cases = 11
 

2014-2015


April 2014 - March 15 number of new cases = 10

(NB: The figures for C.diff include only hospital-acquired cases) 

  • C.difficile is a bacterium that can cause severe infection in the gut. The result is watery diarrhoea and stomach cramps that are very weakening, especially in elderly and ill people.

  • It is spread by touch with the contaminated diarrhoea, directly with an affected patient or by indirect contact with the bacteria in the environment.

  • Spread can be prevented by washing hands after going to the toilet and before and after meals, by keeping the hospital clean and by nursing separately.